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2 edition of Evolution of parasites found in the catalog.

Evolution of parasites

British Society for Parasitology. symposium

Evolution of parasites

by British Society for Parasitology. symposium

  • 312 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Blackwell in Oxford .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementedited by Angela E R Taylor.
SeriesBlackwell"s Scientific Publications
ContributionsTaylor, Angela E R.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14107210M

Abstract: We analyze the evolutionary consequences of host resistance (the ability to decrease the probability of being infected by parasites) for the evolution of parasite virulence (the deleterious effect of a parasite on its host). When only single infections occur, host resistance does not affect the evolution of parasite virulence. However, when superinfections occur, resistance tends to Cited by: Imagine a world where parasites steer the course of evolution, where the majority of species are parasites. Welcome to earth. Parasites are among the world’s most successful and sophisticated organisms. They can transform the insides of other creatures into hospitable homes.

Experimental evolution has demonstrated that hosts do not evolve only in the presence of parasites but also that evolution proceeds very quickly. Capaul and Ebert () tested the extent to which parasite-mediated selection by different parasite species influenced competition among clones of the cyclic parthenogen D. by: 2. Where's the evolution? Parasites and pathogens don't arise de novo from the primordial slime. They evolve from other organisms (usually from other parasites and pathogens). To understand how this happens, it helps to remember that to these bugs, the human species is a habitable ecosystem.

  The book is both a journey into cutting-edge science and a revelatory examination of what it means to be human. Below is an excerpt from McAuliffe's "This Is Your Brain on Parasites Author: Live Science Staff.   The conventional view of adaptation is that it operates at the level of the individual organism, but recent observations of the evolution of virulence Cited by:


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Evolution of parasites by British Society for Parasitology. symposium Download PDF EPUB FB2

Evolutionary Ecology of Parasites presents an evolutionary framework for the study of parasite biology, combining theory with empirical examples for a broader understanding of why parasites are as they are and do what they do.

An up-to-date synthesis of the field, the book is an ideal teaching tool for advanced courses on the by: Parasites and the Behavior of Animals shows that parasite-induced behavioral alterations are more common than we might realize, and it places these alterations in an evolutionary and ecological context.

Emphasizing eukaryotic parasites, the book examines the adaptive nature of behavioral changes associated with parasitism, exploring the effects of these changes on parasite transmission, parasite avoidance, and the fitness of both host and by: The evolution of virulence may depend on a virulence-transmission trade-off, but that trade-off may in turn depend on the host's condition or age, and trade-offs between virulence and other traits of the parasite may be more important for some parasites.

Co-evolution and Evolution of parasites book situations, such as the emergence of a new disease, complicate matters further. and evolution of parasites are presented, being derived from a combination of popu- lation biology, evolutionary theory and parasite biology. Third, predictions derived from the general concepts act as a guide to critical characteristics of parasite biol- ogy which need to.

The Evolution of Parasitism - A Phylogenetic Perspective aims to bring together a range of articles that exemplifies the phylogenetic approach as applied to various disciplines within parasitology and as applied by parasitologists. Unified by the use of phylogenies, this book tackles a wide variety of parasite-specific biological problems across a diverse range of taxa.

The book deploys a broad and comprehensive approach, aimed at understanding the origins and developments of various parasite groups, in order to provide a wider evolutionary picture of parasitism as part of biodiversity.

Evolutionary Ecology of Parasites presents an evolutionary framework for the study of parasite biology, combining theory with empirical examples for a broader understanding of why parasites are as they are and do what they do. An up-to-date synthesis of the field, the book is an ideal teaching tool for advanced courses on the subject.

Parasites have evolved independently in numerous animal lineages, and now make up a considerable proportion of the biodiversity of life. Ecologists, epidemiologists, conservationists and evolutionary biologists are increasingly aware of the universal significance of parasites to the study of ecology and evolution where they have become a powerful model system.

Underlying this diversity is evolution. It is widely appreciated that parasites are prone to rapid evolution, and because of their often short generation times and large population sizes, parasites may evolve far more rapidly than their by: 1.

Introduction. Medical Parasitology is the science dealing with parasites that infect man, causing disease and misery in most countries of the tropics. They plague billions of people, kill millions annually, and inflict debilitating injuries such as blindness and disfiguration on additional Size: KB.

For the first time, this book gives a comprehensive overview over the many facets of host-parasite interactions, from the molecular bases to individual strategies and to the ecological and evolutionary consequences.

It is informed by the progress in our understanding that. a parasite Mosquito in the transmission of filariasis C- Definitive host in the life cycle of a parasite Female Anopheles mosquito in the life cycle of malarial parasites D- Vector (either mechanical/biological) in the transmission of an infectious disease Tick in the transmission of Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme diseaseFile Size: 1MB.

Evolution of Infectious Disease is a book by the evolutionary biologist Paul W. Ewald. In this book Ewald contests the traditional view that parasites should evolve toward benign coexistence with their hosts.

He draws on various studies which contradict this dogma and asserts his own theory that is based on fundamental evolutionary : Paul W. Ewald. The present book deals with the ecology, epidemiology, and evolution of the parasites of Daphnia and other Cladocerans.

The second part will deal with the taxonomy and natural history of Cited by: Table List of parasites mentioned in this book. Bacteria.

Six species of bacteria have been described parasitizing of them infect the hemolymph, whereas two are intracellular infections of the fat cells and the eggs, respectively. Genetics and Evolution of Infectious Diseases is at the crossroads between two major scientific fields of the 21st century: evolutionary biology and infectious diseases.

The genomic revolution has upset modern biology and has revolutionized our approach to ancient disciplines such as evolutionary studies.

Finally, I consider different ways to study the evolution of antigenic variation. Experimental evolution of parasites under controlled condi-tions provides one way to study the relations between molecular rec-ognition, the dynamics of infections within hosts, and the evolution-ary changes in parasite antigens.

Sampling of parasites from evolvingCited by: The book is composed of 11 chapters, moving from the biology of individual parasites, to populations, and communities.

After the introduction, Chapters 2–5 concentrate on the origins of parasitism and complex life cycles, host specificity, the evolution of parasite life‐history strategies, and strategies of host exploitation. Most parasite groups evolved before the Mesozoic era, more than million years ago.

These old groups are also, generally, the largest, and as such contain the most species. "The 10 largest. I’m often asked by students to suggest books they can read about parasites.

Below is a list of books that I’ve read and enjoyed. The list will be updated over time. Please feel free to suggest books that I should add to the list in the comments. Textbooks or textbook-like books.

1 Introduction to the Ecology, Epidemiology, and Evolution of Parasitism in Daphnia. This chapter provides a short introduction to the topic of the book. I define parasites as any small organism closely associated with, and harmful to, a larger organism.

Carl Zimmer's outside-the-box Parasite Rex offers this reliable testament to evolution without design: a species of parasitic fluke enters its animal host by, like most, getting itself eaten and transported, through natural means, to the host's gut.

This is precisely where the fluke wants to be/5.An up-to-date synthesis of the field, the book is an ideal teaching tool for advanced courses on the subject.

Pointing toward promising directions and setting a research agenda, it will also be an invaluable reference for researchers who seek to extend our knowledge of parasite ecology and evolution.